About your Search

20140226
20140306
STATION
CSPAN 46
LANGUAGE
English 46
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
positions in the government going around and questioning climate change. this is what the environment secretary says -- people get very emotional about it. people should just accept the climate has been changing for centuries. the energy minister went on about climate change. you are not going to draw me on that. i haven't had time to get into the climate change debate. [laughter] he is the energy minister, mr. speaker. will the prime minister clarify, is he happy that there are climate change deniers in his government? >> this is obviously the new approach to prime minister's questions. you come in and praise the prime minister for his commitment to climate change. i like the new style. i think this is much more refreshing. this government has a solid track record of cutting carbon and investing in nuclear. the biggest renewable energy program we have seen in this country, for the first time in a long time we are on track to the renewable target. perhaps he would like to get up again and congratulate me on the record on the energy environment. >> the whole country will have heard the
had it. it was in a different environment. now i have a congressional blackberry and a campaign iphone plus a wireless beeper that i use. i have high definition television sets. you name it. my eight-year-old son has a laptop computer and a tablet. a whole different ballgame. the way we use what we now call the internet, how we use wireless communications, they all need to be brought up to speed. if we get any bipartisanship at all in the next congress, i think you will see us do that. >> what is the timeframe you are looking at? >> i am chairman emeritus. this is a chairman fred upton -- subcommittee chairman walden trying. i plan to be very involved. i would hope that with the right environment we could do a bill in the next congress. mr. walden and mr. upton have both told me personally they are going to be doing lots of hearings and papers to set the groundwork. >> another issue you have been involved in is online gambling. sheldon adelson has come out against allowing federal framework for online gambling saying he will do whatever it takes to stop that. does that worry you? does
as less than important. the current command environment makes it hard to keep outside influences away from all criminal cases in a command regardless of the commander's view or the unit's view of them as commanders. removing all judicial punishment decisions from the command will keep them clear of all repercussions, including to their command, their career, and their general morale of the unit. loafing judicial punishment with commanders is not just a problem in the mishandling of sexual assault cases with the victim blaming. i have experienced, as well as others, a command environment is simply not a top -- not a top-down environment. my new -- a new commander may take command in an established structure, and the disruption of the structure regardless of how honorable their intentions can lead challenges to that command. this removal of the judicial punishments from the command would remove conflicts both to and from the commanders. this also prevents a commander from lessening the charges to whatever keeps it in the command, or at its lowest levels, either out of concern that the accuse
, and which prohibited commonsense uses of cheap and safe fuel that could actually help the environment. and department of transportation regulations that, without increasing safety, vastly increased record eping for ready-mix concrete drivers, unnecessarily limited their hours and suppressed their wages. title 2 of the alert act helps to protect people like bob sells and his workers from regulations that ask job creators to achieve the unyou a cheeveble. do not -- the unachievable, do not help to control targets, suppress hours and wages for no good reasons and inundate americans with unnecessary paperwork. title 3 of the alert act offers long-needed help to small business people like carl harris, the vice president and general manager of carl harris company in wichita, kansas. mr. harris is a small homebuilder. every day he has to fight and overcome the fact that government regulations now account for 25% of the final price of a new single-family home. mr. harris participants in small business review panels, existing law uses to try to lower the cost of regulations for small businesse
. in the current political environment, we are not likely to return to levels of spending favored by the most ardent proponents in organizations like aei, on the hill. the budget plan announced monday would provide more over the next five years. we think it is a realistic proposal that reflect strategic imperative as well as the resources the department might ,easonably expect to receive albeit with strong leadership and cooperation in the congress. they will help remedy some of the damage caused by sequestration. mitigate the impact of potential cuts in the future. if the 26 billion dollars provided by the administration's proposed opportunity growth and security fund is also approved for fy 2015, the military near-term readiness picture improves significantly. and associated proposals provide a sustainable path towards shaping -- fulfilling the president defense strategy. as the department assessed our strategic environment, we have drawn upon work from outside organizations. aei has made some important contributions to our understanding on all of these issues. i will dive into a couple of
environment we heard about how a lot of the coverage around elections wasn't particularly polarized. there are undoubtedly concerns around the future of where this is going to be. fragile my work is on states in general. fragile states tend to be fractured state. and we are seeing an increase in the fragmented and fractured media in afghanistan and the most fractured part of that getting quiteably significant injections of funding at the moment. if the last length -- it is the that isng for a state trying to chart its own national identity -- it is not necessarily a useful way of going. but as the media -- but the media is becoming ever more fractured and fragile. >> how solid do you think is the support that you expect to see in terms ofection governmental support for the concept of a free media? i know there was discussion recently about freedom of the press in afghanistan. >> again, when you compare it to other countries, afghanistan has had a remarkable -- has managed to create a remarkable space of freedom of media. this is because -- we should give credit to president karzai .
steps in advancing and protecting human rights. to foster an environment that allows for dialogue and political reconciliation, some of the specific areas we encourage progress is in releasing prisoners who have -- encouraging confidence building and reconciliation and accountability for allegations of security force excesses. this, weghout all of unequivocally reject violence on all sides and we want to encourage the positive evolution bahrain.jn -- of >> about venezuela. thishreat continues in country against freedom of expression. president maduro is opening a news conference about peace. about it?our comments >> on more specific venezuela developments, i would have to give the floor to marie. but with respect to the human rights report, we certainly identified a number of key concerns in development in 2013. the passage of presidential decree powers, increases of power in the executive branch, we documented legal actions against tv stations, media outlets and journalists. we also documented the use of the judiciary to intimidate and selectively prosecute political union busine
to the environment by the way it is being grown in california. i agree that california might get around this, but it is doing a lot of damage to the environment the way it is being done in california. as it turns out, i did see that piece. the legalizers would say that is why this needs to be legalized. you go out into the wilderness in california, yes, they are using tremendous amounts of pesticides, herbicides and who knows what. the environmental this action is quite phenomenal. this is marijuana growth outside the law. the legalizers would say that is one more reason to bring it under a state jurisdiction, because that way the environmental benefits even to legalizing marijuana. piece. great if people are interested in this as an issue, go on mother jones. host: a tweet from a viewer -- guest: which is what happened last week and san francisco. a mom had her daughter set up in of a medical marijuana dispensary and sold out 157 boxes in record time. excited -- aside, what are the under industries -- other industries popping up because of colorado? guest: that is the joke that' frito sales
supply of hundreds of thousands of people. finally we must be mindful of the environment. first we operate in a time of severe budget constraints. as secretary of the department of homeland security, i therefore believe i am obligated to identify and eliminate inefficiencies, waste and unnecessary duplications of resources across the large and de-centralized bureaucracy, while pursuing important missions such as the recapitalization of the aging coast guard fleet. second, i am mindful of the surveys that reflect that morale is low. i intend to constantly remind our work force of the critical importance of their homeland security mission and that the department's greatest asset in pursuit of these mission is his our people. i will be a champion for the men and women of d.h.s., and i will advocate on their behalf. i look forward to working with this committee. the chairman is correct that i am actively working to fill the vacancies in senior management positions. i do that on a daily basis, and i look forward to a shared vision and a partnership with congress on our important mission
that is part of our environment, utilizing that in a way that generates an electricity and does it in a benign way, is a very strong cornerstone advanced by the president in this effort. also the $4. 2 billion he brings forth to provide for innovation and create new outcomes for energy purposes, not only with efficiency and generation but the transmission of that energy supply and looking at efforts to expand and make permanent the production tax credits that are so important for renewable energy in this country. so those are two good, very valuable investments. let me then just highlight a few others that i believe will be a progress i outcome if we are to accept this notion here in congress. one would be to address the clean energy research program and the president does that with a major down payment for clean energy research, he also addresses the advanced research project agency in the energy capacity, acronymed out at arpa-e. it commits a very laser sharp focus on research as it relates to innovation in the energy sector. will all those outcomes be successful? perhaps not. in fact, the c
or the environment. that is an important point to be made. that is the argument being used against keystone. host: he also asked you about unemployment insurance. guest: i am open to that. we offered a bill that we would be really -- we would be willing to support. we put forward alternatives that i have supported and republicans would support. we have to make sure that as we passed legislation we are addressing the deficit and the debt. a 17.2 trillion dollar debt. we have to address that for future generations. to a caller from alaska, anchorage, alaska. patrick, republican line. you are on was senator hoven. caller: good morning. thank you for the washington journal. it is a very valuable resource for us. senator hoven, i have two questions. because of the previous caller, i wanted to clarify one point regarding private and public oil out of alaska. governor hickle saw to it that we became an owner states. much closer to that oil being private oil than it is public. the oil companies appear are telling us that the reason there is only 500,000 barrels a day going down the pipe is because structure
for a solitary confinement has left some sense reductions environment to of violence, restraint shares, inmates can themselves up which used to happen every week. almost totally eliminated as a result of these changes. reducing the duration. those that used to go there for drugs, they may still go, but if they test claim of bacon graduate out of solitary confinement and a summit is being kept for more than 72 hours a decision is reviewed by the commissioner. i also want to know that one of the keys in texas to reduce in solitary confinement has been the gain enunciation program. announcing their gang. i also want to point out that using sanctions and incentives behind bars is a way to provide for incentives that the inmates to be a better which therefore reduces the need for solitary confinement. one of the models of the parallel universe model. the longer curfew. does that ms. b gave have been denied privileges such as making donegals and access to the mail and other things. this creates a positive incentive. we notice things like the white hope program. there is a 24 hours timeout. we have to
agree that an environment of low rates, low interest rates, especially when it p prevails for a long time, and we have had a long period of low interest rates can give rise to behavior that poses threats to financial stability. and therefore we need to be looking at that very carefully. and we are doing so in a very thorough way, i believe. there are a number of things that we are monitoring. measures of asset prices and whether or not they appear to be diverging from historical norms. namely it's hard but trying to spot any asset price bubbles that might be emerging. we're looking at leverage, which build up in leverage can be very dangerous to the financial system and pose stability risks. we're looking at trends in leverage. we're looking at credit growth to see whether or not that has potentially worrisome trends. in addition to that we're looking the particularly through the stress tests at financial institutions and a low interest rate environment. we have to worry about whether or not they're appropriately dealing with interest rate risk ls. we have been looking at that and, i
that an environment of low rates, low interest rates, especially when it p prevails for a long time, and we have had a long period of low interest rates can give rise to behavior that poses threats to financial stability. and therefore we need to be looking at that very carefully. and we are doing so in a very thorough way, i believe. there are a number of things that we are monitoring. measures of asset prices and whether or not they appear to be diverging from historical norms. namely it's hard but trying to spot any asset price bubbles that might be emerging. we're looking at leverage, which build up in leverage can be very dangerous to the financial system and pose stability risks. we're looking at trends in leverage. we're looking at credit growth to see whether or not that has potentially worrisome trends. in addition to that we're looking the particularly through the stress tests at financial institutions and a low interest rate environment. we have to worry about whether or not they're appropriately dealing with interest rate risk ls. we have been looking at that and, in fact, our current st
the environment and clean water standards is not antigrowth. in fact, it's projobs. when i recently toured the family-run trucking company in my district, they were not against truck safety standards. they do the right thing by their workers and they abide by safe driving rules. and they want regulations to ensure that others do the same. what they are against are new truck safety standards that hinder growth without actually making trucking any safer. smarter regulations should protect good businesses from bad actors. i'll give you another example. denny hudson, he runs sea coast bank, a small community bank in florida. like many small financial institutions, they weathered the financial crisis because they were not involved in the risky financial behavior. they expected mortgages to be repaid on time and they wanted the small businesses they supported to succeed. after the financial crisis of 2008, nearly took down the global economy, most people agreed that government regulators needed to better protect our financial system. but if new regulations keep community banks like sea coast fro
such as entities committed to protecting and preserving our nation's environment natural resources or the communities that could be directly impacted by such activities. to be clear, i strongly support the rights of industry to have an opportunity to provide comments on proposed rules. it fosters more informed quality rulemaking and benefits both business and broader society. indeed, that's why our current administrative procedures mandate that a public comment process be conducted to allow any individual or corporation to participate and provide input and feedback in an equal, fair and open process. that's current law. the amendment that congresswoman duckworth and i are proposing today would simply ensure that all participants in the rulemaking process be provided equal consultation rights with agencies. for example, as the ranking member, mr. cummings, noted earlier, if the u.s. department of agriculture were to have a rule in an effort to protect the health of everyday americans, our amendment would ensure that not only the agribusinesses but also food safety experts, children'
and inform community decisions about the environment and the economy. but maybe the most important factor is many of the hard-working people in this particular part of the state depend on the york river to support their jobs. the york river is a place where people go to work. ommercial and we see this especially in the western part of the united states that when he's areas are designated either wild and scenic or wilderness, what happens is areas around that become de facto wilderness or de facto wild and scenic which many, many times imposes on private property rights. now we've experienced that more in the west than what my colleagues have in the east and my colleague from maine expressed rightly so this has very, very broad support. i'm sure it does. they work very hard on that but the danger in the future is, if taken to the extreme, you could have, unless we had within the study, you could have some pressures on private property rights. we think that is sufficiently important to put that in the studies so that those that will be affected know about it. i hope the outcome is such that
environment, and i would hope that everyone understand that it is all about order. and if we don't have order, we cannot provide programs. we're constantly looking down institutions. since the hearing in 2012, we have restricted housing population reduction by 25 perce percent. we have gone from 13.5 percent to 6.5 percent. so reductions are occurring. we are only interested in placing people in restrictive housing when there is justification. we have 20,000 gang members in our system. they are watching this hearing. they are watching our testimony very, very closely for the reason being if they see we will lower standards and not hold the individuals accountable, it puts the staff and inmates at risk. and this is why i mentioned in my oral statement, we are looking at staff being injured and harmed but our staff is putting their lives on the line to protect the american public. and we have inmates within the population who are being harmed by these individuals who have no respect, i mean no respect for other's when it comes to their safety. we cannot afford, at any time, to say that for thos
commitments to sustain that. it is the question of what the ifc and the world bank called enabling environment. there's not a shortage of money. they are enormously wealthy. they are regional investors. they would like to put money in, but can they trust in the rules of the game and the rules of law to do that. minerals are not going to be a magic bullet, but oil and gas resources that are being discovered recently are quite immense. inis not inconceivable that 10-15 years, they can more than underwrite the cost of sustaining said -- sustaining stability. in conclusion, let's move from thinking of quick fixes and magic bullets to understanding that peace and stability and governance were at the heart of peace and stability. it is the many small wins that will deliver this for afghans. the question is can the politics deliver something that the middle 90% of afghans who order and law and want that feature -- and want that future can realize it. you very much, andrew. it is a great pleasure to be here. i want to join you and others in thanking u.s. ip and others in sponsoring this. it is humblin
to foster job growth and promote a greener and cleaner environment for the next generation. the p.t.c., production tax credit, also creates jobs. in my district, the capital region of new york state, we are host to g.e.'s global research center and wind turbines service septre. in 2012 alone, g.e.'s wind division produced some 1,722 megawatts of power and provided a local capital investment of some $3.2 billion. if we are serious about helping the private sector create quality jobs that will put purchasing power back in the hands of the middle class, we must support wind power as one part of our overall energy policy and strategy. madam speaker, today i renew my support for wind power and the almost 2,000 jobs this clean energy source generates in my home state of new york. a number that is growing by the day, and a group whose work every day is helping to grow our economy, clean the air we breathe, and the water we drink, and make us truly energy independent. with that i thank you, madam speaker, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair reco
you, mr. speaker. i rise today as a member of the sustainable energy and environment coalition to talk about a significant issue for massachusetts and our nation. the wind production tax credit. in the past two years, clean energy jobs in massachusetts have grown by 24%, and are projected to grow another 11% in 2014. thanks to the wind industry, the commonwealth has seen an influx of over 200 -- $200 million in capital investment and is home to nine wind-related manufacturing facilities. massachusetts is also home to the wind technology testing center, which at the time of its opening, was the first facility in the country capable of testing large-scale wind turbine blades up to 300 feet in length. this testing center has created high-skilled jobs and has helped spur the development of next generation blades made here in the united states. we must act now to make sure that these innovative american businesses continue to create new manufacturing opportunities here in the united states. i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting an extension of the wind production tax credit. thank y
nation's infrastructure. he also said i am honored to replace my friend as chair of the environment and public works transportation and infrastructure subcommittee. he will be heading that up. tweeting outffice the president's new competition will help put americans to work by repairing america's infrastructure. is one by the american progress group in washington. everyone billion dollars invested in infrastructure equals 10,000 to 15,000 jobs created. california,ale independent. what do you think? they worriedre about the infrastructure when we have all of these buildings throughout the silicon valley and all throughout a bunch of places in america and none of them are filled with any businesses. they are there and they took up all of this money to build. host: you do not think any more infrastructure spending? caller: i do not think so. host: what about roads and bridges? caller: i think most of the bridges out here are good. we just finished the bay bridge out here a couple months back. it was way out of the ballpark and they should not have spent that much. host: larry, utah, re
, public or private. if we really want a stable, predictable business environment, we wouldn't be going down this path. at the end of the day, again, the proposition is very straightforward. if you support consumer protection, you will vote no on this legislation. if you oppose consumer protection, you will vote yes. but i plead with you to please vote no. hank you, mr. chair. the chair: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. hensarling: mr. chairman, i yield myself five seconds to encourage the gentleman from washington to read section 1017 of the dodd-frank fact and would discover that the cfpb is funded by the federal reserve which happens to be taxpayer money. at this time, mr. chairman, i'm happy to yield one minute to the gentleman from missouri, mr. luetkemeyer, the vice chairman of our housing subcommittee. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. luetkemeyer: thank you, mr. chairman. my colleagues have done a good job listing problems of the cfpb. i want to tell you about the overreach of this already. one business purchased a small lending company and
to build healthier learning environments for our kids. part of this effort will be eliminating advertisements for unhealthy food and beverages in our schools. thatnk we can all agree our classroom should be healthy places where kids are not bombarded with ads for junk food. food marketing guidelines are tot of the larger effort inspire companies to think about how they campaign for food to kids. kids watch thousands of food advertisements every year. 86% of these ads are for products loaded with sugar and salt. our kids see an average of just one ad a week for healthy products like water, fruits and vegetables. just one. begun the we have first ever white house summit on food advertising to children, asking businesses to stop marketing unhealthy foods to kids and do more to get kids excited about healthy foods. should applynciple to our schools. about theant to talk "let's move" campaign. the federal government's efforts to combat childhood obesity. you can see the numbers on your screen. do you think this is a good idea? isn't an area of the federal area that the federal gover
of the environment in which we pursue all these missions. first we operate in a time of severe budget constraints. as secretary of the department of homeland security, i therefore believe i am obligated to identify and eliminate inefficiencies, waste and unnecessary duplications of resources across dhs' large and decentralized beurocracy while pursuing important missions such as the recap tallization of the aging coast guard fleet. second, i am mindful of the surveys that reflect that morale is low within various components of dhs. i intend to remind our workforce of the importance of their homeland security mission and that the department's greatest asset in the pursuit of these missions is our people. i will be a champion for the men and women of dhs, and i will advocate on their behalf. i look forward to working with this committee. the chairman is correct that i am actively working to full the vacancies in senior management positions. i do that on a daily basis. i look forward to a shared vision and a partnership with congress on our important mission. thank you. >> thank you, secretary. i be
of the new media environment. the consumer is a much more in control. you just have to wait to be spoonfed when of the major networks wanted to give you. now there's this rich cornucopia, and your biggest challenge is to sit through the vast array of information available to you. it is there if you want to find it very -- it. the: we're talking about president and his 90 minute conversation with vladimir putin. i think vladimir putin views barack obama? guest: how shall i put this? i think he holds him and minimal high regard. warning sign that he was start taking him lightly was in september 2009. it was september 17. on that fateful day, barack obama made a unilateral decision, without insulting his allies that he was going to and the program that had been developed under the previous administration to build missile defense systems in the czech republic and poland, two of our strongest allies. the czech and polish government had really gone out on a limb and sacrificed a lot of credibility and prestige. their product -- they thought tremendous little battles to get these bases approved c
in that environment. we have learned through a variety of approaches things that we probably didn't expect would be now in front of us this soon. for instance, what are the hereditary factors involved in this disease? it clearly runs in families. we have gone from knowing sort of one risk factor for the late onset type of alzheimer's disease to now depending on who you ask 19 or 20 that we have. that number is growing. in fact, it will be growing rapidly this coming year in part because of the fy-'14 appropriation because we're expanding our ability to do that kind of genetic analysis. we have gone from understanding that amyloid was a player to understanding a lot more about tau and to be able to look at pathways in the brain that are really quite complex and point to other sort of nodes in those pathways that are really important and might be drugable. we have gone from having a few clinical trials focused largely on advanced cases of alzheimer's to what you heard about today, where we now, because we can make the prediction about high risk, start the treatment earlier. just like people have o
and education issues. the next in line was documentaries about the environment and after that, immigration. we are going to tell you about the grand prize winners this year. it was a team. their topic was called earth first, fracking second. it was a three person team from long beach polytechnic high school. they are served by charter communications. as a three team member in that .roup, >>, michaela, and sarah we are going to be talking with emma right now. you was your reaction when heard you one grand prize? >> we were shocked. we looked across at one another and could not believe it. >> when you finished the documentary, did you have a sense of how good it was? >> we did not. >> how did you get interested in the contest? >> our ninth grade government teacher. how did your team come together? were you able to pick your teams or did the teacher assign them? >> we could pick our team members. we chose other people we have known for a few years. we knew we worked well together. >> when you joined forces with any ofa and sarah, had you done documentaries before? >> no. we watched a lot of video
their bills. this bill provides a commonsense way to protect our environment by setting emissions standards that are actually achieveable. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from indiana yields back. the gentleman from kentucky reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: i yield three minutes to the gentleman from west virginia, mr. rahall. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. rahall: thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate the ranking member yielding me this time, especially since we do not see eye to eye on this particular piece of legislation. we do see eye to eye on numerous other issues before the congress and the american people, such as protecting the health and safety of our nation's coal miners and our american workers, and indeed, we all, both sides of the aisle, share the common goal of wanting to provide clean water, clean air, and health and safety for our families each and every day of the year. in that sense, we all have that common ground. the
environment with controlled education get there is a wonderful wolved world out there in america. it turned into a question and answer period and there were students asking questions, most of them dealing with agriculture and i was answering them through ed, the interpreter and at a certain point it became too rapid fire and he took it over and took over the conversation. i remember one big-faced kids who said who sets the markets of -- markets for agriculture products? what would be the price for beans, rice, corn, otes and wheats. i answered him that the market sets the prices. how does the market set the prices? there's a buy whore makes the offer, there's a sell whore decides whether or not to take it. if the seller says no, the buyer might decide to raise his price until they get to a place where they agree. that was an amazing concept that it looked like they'd never heard that before. no one sets the prices? how can it be that no one sets the prices? and second thing, how many times -- how often does the price change? it can change hundreds of times a day. it changes every transactio
wage, unemployment benefits and the environment. so the do nothing congress held a hearing yesterday entitled enforcing the president's constitutional duty to faithfully execute the law. the intent was clear, attack the president. and it was held in the judiciary committee which has your diction over immigration. here was lots of discussion. this is where the president has power to temporarily suspend the deportation of people who came here to the u.s. as children. apparently when the president stood just over there last month and delivered his state of the union address saying he would use his pen and phone to take executive action where the congress was taking no action, well, they didn't go over well for this do nothing cock. look, i know it's easy for republicans to blame obama and why they can't do reform this year. but you have to keep it connected to reality. you put your principles for immigration reform on the table. you call them standards, and there was some things i liked and some things i didn't. but what i said was, good, thank you, it's a nice start. let's sit down and
insurance company. mr. allison was awed on that visit, he was awed by durham and its thriving environment for african-american business. on that visit pete became acquainted with a gentleman named john stewart whom i remember so well. president of mutual savings and loan association there in durham, and he was offered a job as a teller. he was more than a teller, after 25 years he became chief executive officer in less than 25 years. that was remarkable. during his tenure at the savings and loan association, he continued to build on the groundbreaking work of other men ke john and c.c. and mr. moore, and james shepherd, and john wheeler, and w.g. pierson, and many, many others in helping to grow what was known nationally as the black wall street. pete served at the helm of mutual savings and loan during the institution's most successful years. he spearheaded the transition from a mutual savings and loan association to a mutual savings bank, and also led to the acquisitions of american federal savings and loan and greensboro national bank. mr. allison was a pillar of the durham community f
an environment where we can work through the current situation. as i noted in my opening comments, a number of diplomatic economic tracks are now in play. the president initiated those with our european partners. the u.n., osce, nato, buddha pest part -- budapest partners that signed the 1994 agreement, don't know what the status that have is today, but secretary kerry, as you know, was supposed to meet with the minister today. whether that's happened or not. these different tracks, diplomatic, economic, solve this problem diplomatically. we have interest, of course we do. that's the goal as you ask, what are we pursuing and what are we doing? i think it's the right approach. responsible approach. >> so would you say our goal is to de-escalate tensions or to see the russians removed from the crimea? >> we made that clear, our position. we have recognized the new government. we have said that the russians, as you know they have a basing agreement with crimea, and their troops should return to their barracks. there's a threshold how many troops they can have in the crimea, and this needs to b
of the operating environment, the cultural differences and, of course, the native language capability. we do not believe the special operations variant of the chin yearbook would have fared any differently than extortion 17 on that night. there is no techniadvantage inherent in the special operations model that would have protected it from the rocket that downed the aircraft. we recognize, however, that these helicopters are vulnerable to regrenades. although there's currently no proven system to counter that particular weapon and that particular enemy tactic in the two and a half years since this tragic loss, we have fielded 24 different survivability and safety equipment upgrades on over 2,000 of our military aircraft. with the chinook ch-47 receiving as many as four of these individual up grades, and we continue our efforts, with the support of congress, to fund the research and development to develop the countermeasures that we would need to protect against the rpg. but i have to say no chances in technology or any change in the way we operate will bring back our fallen heros or's the pa
they destroy our environment. madam president, we democrats have a different vision. democrats believe the economy is strongest when the middle complas is vibrant and -- middle class is vibrant and growing. democrats believe that world-class education leads to world-class work and this work is one where people are ready to take on any challenge. right now, madam president, there's at least three people for every job that's available. democrats believe in an even playing field with higher wages, affordable health care, and a secure retirement for every american, so that every american can have a shot at success. i welcome a debate over these competing visions. the average american shares our vision for a country whose success is built on a strong middle class. the koch brothers know americans share our vision for a country whose success is built on a strong middle class. that's why rather than having an honest and fair debate, they're pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into a massive campaign of deception. they manufacture stories, make up facts. they're angry that i'm calling atte
to do to try to stabilize an environment that has become dangerous in many respects. we will have a chance talk about , a country that is of critical importance, where we have the opportunity, i think i might to move beyond recent over several west years and there is a path to transition within egypt. to security asnt well as u.s. security. we will talk about iraqi and my absolutely -- my absolute to makee -- commitment sure that it ran does not have a nuclear weapon. can potentially lead to a solution that ensures that iran is not developing a nuclear weapon. we will spend time talking about the prospect of peace between israelis and palestinians. i want to commend publicly the efforts that prime minister netanyahu have made and very link the and painstaking negotiations with my secretary of state, john kerry. are tough negotiations. the issues are profound. the reason that they would have been resolved years ago but prime minister netanyahu has approached these negotiations with a level of seriousness and commitment that reflect his leadership and the desire for the israeli peop
to this. in future environments, ciber will be the first tool used. >> by both sides? >> by both sides. host: we are joined by paul mcleary a you are watching the exchange at the senate armed services committee earlier this week. the united states, it there's not much dispute that the u.s. has the best conventional military force in the world but how do our cyber capability stack up against other countries? guest: it's hard to measure. the chinese have put a lot of money into this and they have a lot of resources and assets directed toward this but their budget is not public like ours. you don't know exactly what they are doing. what general alexander was saying cuts to the heart of the matter. mightwar, whatever that be, offense or defense of, there is no manual for it. it is a whole new world, a new form of warfare. how do you conduct it, what does it mean, when would this lead to more conventional operations and how do u.s. collate or de-escalate and how do you make that a determined factor to prevent future conflicts? host: if you want to talk about these subjects or have a questio
and it improves the environment. so we can and do disagree in this congress on the causes of climate change and the best fuel mix to meet america's energy demands, but we can all agree that less is more. whatever your fuel source, if you use less you save money, and that's good for all of us concerned. we can also agree that creating demand for american-made energy efficient products will also create good jobs, and energy efficiency, cheapest fuel, requires, as i said, labor and manufactured goods that are made in america. and we can also all agree that cutting the energy bills of homeowners, businesses and the federal government and therefore the taxpayer is a very good thing. . mr. speaker, the vermont that a i represent has long been a leader in energy efficiency. my home state was the first to set up what was called an energy efficiency utility. that utility, efficiency vermont, has done outstanding work for the past 20 years. basically what it acknowledges and understands is that a kilowatt saved is a cost avoided. last year alone efficiency vermont's work yieldled -- yielded a lifetim
institutes. it supports groundbreaking research to fight disease, protect the environment and develop new technologies and enhances the administration's management efforts to deliver a government that's more effective, efficient and supportive of economic growth. the budget also includes measures designed to expand opportunity for all americans. for example, as gene will discuss, it doubles the maximum value of the earned income tax credit for childless workers, to build on the eitc success and encouraging people to enter the work force and reduce poverty. it invests in the president's vision of making access to high-quality preschool available to every 4-year-old and it invests in new efforts to drive greater performance and innovation in work force training. to ensure the nation's long-term fiscal strength, the budget focuses on what are the primary drivers of long-term debt and deficits. particularly health care cost growth and inadequate revenues to meet the needs of our aging population. it builds on the reforms of the affordable care act with another $400 billion in health care savi
. in the political environment we are not likely to return to levels of spending favored by the most ardent defense proponents and organizations like aei on the hill or frankly in the pentagon. now the budget plan announced monday would provide $115 billion more over the next five years then sequester level funding. if it is a realistic puzzle that reflect strategic as well as the resources the department might reasonably expect to receive albeit with strong leadership and cooperation in the congress. if enacted it will help remedy some of the damage article is by sequestration albeit with continued training and maintenance shortfalls in the near term and potential cuts in the future. if the $26 billion provided by the administration's proposed opportunity growth and security fund is also approved for fy2015 the military's near-term readiness picture improves significantly. the budget plan and associated proposals divide a sustainable path towards shaping the force able to protect the nation and fulfill the president's defense strategy. albeit with some additional risk. as the department assessed o
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)